Jonathan Franzen’s 10 Rules of Writing (via 101 Books)

I love finding posts that are about reading and writing, especially ones that I feel I can a gain new perspective on writing. Granted, I can’t take credit for any of the posts that I repost since they are all freshly pressed. WordPress’s freshly pressed has been such a great way for me to discover blogs. I think it is interesting that a theme I have noticed among blog writers (at least wordpress bloggers) is that a lot of people have either decided to devote more time to writing on a weekly if not daily basis, and many have also decided that this is the year they are going to read everything; i.e. Lovemesomebooks are reading a book a week for the entire year, and 101 Books is reading Time Magazine’s 100 best novels since 1923 plus Ulysses ( I have Ulysses on my reading list too, so far I’ve only made it to pg. 38).

Maybe this isn’t some collective conscience phenomena, this dedication to writing and reading in 2011, and it’s only a random coincidence something I’ve noticed because I had decided to do the same this year, but phenomena or coincidence I still find it interesting.

Jonathan Franzen's 10 Rules of Writing Last week, I posted about George Orwell’s rules for writing, so while I’m finishing book #12: The Corrections I thought this would be a great opportunity to check out what Jonathan Franzen has to say on the subject. This list came from The Guardian: The reader is a friend, not an adversary, not a spectator. Fiction that isn’t an author’s personal adventure into the frightening or the unknown isn’t worth writing for anything but money. Never use t … Read More

via 101 Books

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